Today is the day of the black moon: this is what it means (and why you shouldn't get too excited)

Today is the day of the black moon: this is what it means (and why you shouldn't get too excited)

It happens only once every 33 months, it is true, and it is above all an opportunity to better observe the rest of the celestial vault, or to do a little astronomy review. But no "shows" and "appointments"

(photo: Redlio Designs / Getty Images) If we leave aside tarot, cartomancy, astrology and TV series, the Black Moon of August 19, 2020 (like all the other Black Moons ) is self-defining: it is a Moon that appears completely dark in the sky, that is, in essence, that is not seen. What makes it special is a coincidence with the calendar which occurs only once every 33 months, but looking at the night sky all we can hope to see are stars, planets and maybe a few meteor showers.

The double definition of Black Moon

The expression Black Moon has a popular and unscientific origin, and has become famous above all thanks to social media. The term indicates first of all a phase of the new moon, or new moon, in which our natural satellite is illuminated by the Sun on the side exactly opposite to the one facing the Earth. Consequently, observed from the point of view of people who scan the night sky, the Moon appears very dark, so much so that it is almost invisible. This condition, as is well known, occurs with great regularity every 29 and a half days (to be precise, the average length of the lunar month is 29 days, 12 hours, 44 minutes and 3 seconds), and in fact it cannot be certain. cataloged among the "unmissable events" with the night sky.

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